Gicel Tomimbang

The California Privacy Protection Agency sent a Notice of Cancellation of Regular Meeting canceling its upcoming public meeting where it was scheduled to discuss (and possibly take action on) the Modified Text of Proposed Regulations (“Modified Regs”). The Modified Regs are now scheduled to be considered during the October 28-29, 2022 public meeting,

On October 17, 2022, the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA” or “Agency”) published Modified Text of Proposed Regulations (“Modified Regs”) and Explanation of Modified Text of Proposed Regulations (“Explanation of Modified Regs”). The CPPA review of the Modified Regs has been postponed and is now scheduled to be considered during the October 28-29, 2022 public meeting.

Recall that earlier this year, on May 27, 2022, the CPPA published the first draft of the proposed CPRA Regs and initial statement of reasons. The Agency commenced the formal rulemaking process to adopt the Regs on July 8, 2022, and the 45-day public comment period closed on August 23, 2022. The comments submitted in response to the first draft of the Regs are available here.
Continue Reading Revised Proposed CPRA Regs To Be Considered At October 28, 2022 Meeting

This blog post is a bonus supplement to our quarterly Artificial Intelligence and Biometric Privacy Quarterly Review Newsletter. Be on the lookout for our Q3 Newsletter!

We are quickly approaching the Jan. 1, 2023 operative date of most of the provisions of the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA), which, as most of us know by now, substantially amends the CCPA. Under the CPRA, the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA” or “Agency”) has a mandate to issue regulations on a number of specific topics. With just fewer than three months to go until January 1, regulations are not even close to being finalized.  The Agency released the first draft of proposed regulations on May 24, and the first public comment period ended on August 23. In a meeting held by the CPPA on Friday, September 23, the Agency gave no concrete sense of timing or any comments on topics, such as those discussed in this post, for which regulations have not even been issued. This has left many businesses feeling left in the lurch, uncertain of what to do.
Continue Reading Profiling and Automated Decision-Making: How to Prepare in the Absence of Draft CPRA Regulations

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) currently has limited carve-outs for personal information (PI) collected from a job applicant, employee, owner, director, officer, medical staff member, or independent contractor of a business acting in such capacity (including, without limitation, communications, emergency contact and benefits PI) (HR data). An even broader exception applies to B-to-B communications and related PI (e.g., vendor, supplier and business customer contacts and communications) (B-to-B data). As a result, businesses subject to the CCPA are not currently required to honor CCPA rights requests received from persons concerning HR data and B-to-B data. These carve-outs are set to sunset on January 1, 2023, when the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), which substantially amends the CCPA, goes into full effect, at which point HR data and B-to-B data will be fully subject to all of the requirements of the CCPA/CPRA. Many business administrators had hoped that either the California legislature would extend the HR data exceptions (or maybe even make them permanent), or a federal law that limited data subject rights to traditional consumers would pass and preempt CCPA/CPRA. It is now clear that the former is impossible and the latter is highly unlikely. Accordingly, many companies have a lot to do by year-end to prepare to stand up a CCPA/CPRA program for HR data and B-to-B data.

Continue Reading HR and B-to-B Data Compliance Deadline Looming – Legislative Efforts to Extend California Consumer Privacy Act Exemptions Fail

Join CPW’s Kyle Fath and Gicel Tomimbang as they discuss Privacy in AI with thought leader Christina Montgomery, IBM’s Chief Privacy Officer and AI Ethics Board chair, on September 8 from 12-1 pm PDT. Among other things, you will hear about:

  • The landscape of laws, regulations, and frameworks governing AI and automated decision-making
  • Where the

CPW’s Kyle Fath and Gicel Tomimbang will be featured speakers at the International Association of Privacy Professionals’ Los Angeles KnowledgeNet virtual event on “Privacy in AI” on September 8, 2022, from 12-1 PM PDT.  They will be joined by subject matter expert and thought leader, Christina Montgomery, VP and Chief Privacy Officer, and

On August 1, the New York State Department of Financial Services (“NYDFS” or “DFS”) announced a Consent Order  and $30 million fine against Robinhood Crypto, LLC (“RHC”), the wholly-owned cryptocurrency trading unit of the popular investing app by Robinhood Financial LLC. In the Order, NYDFS alleges RHC failed to comply with NYDFS rules pertaining to

CPW’s Ericka Johnson and Gicel Tomimbang will be the featured speakers at ISSA (Information Systems Security Association) Los Angeles chapter’s June in-person meeting focused on latest cyber threats to national security.  The Biden administration has identified cybersecurity as a national and economic security focus, and has implemented new regulations, expanded existing authorities, and

The California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA” or “Agency”) hosted its first public meeting yesterday following publication of the first draft of proposed regulations (“Regs”) (on May 27) and the initial statement of reasons (“ISOR”) on June 3. Immediately below, we summarize highlights of the meeting held by the CPPA, including taking a further step towards

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) held an open meeting focused on issues related to children’s privacy and those pertaining to the use of endorsements and testimonials in advertising. In the meeting, the FTC adopted a new policy statement targeting data collection practices in educational technology. Further, the FTC proposed amendments to the Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising (“Endorsement Guides”) which would target child-directed marketing. Of note, one of the amendments would recognize that children may react to advertising practices differently than adults and thus advertising practices directed towards children may be treated differently by the FTC compared to those practices directed towards adults.
Continue Reading FTC Targets Children’s Privacy and Stealth Advertising Directed at Children