Photo of Lydia de la Torre

Privacy at the state level can get messy and confusing—particularly in the current moment with the record number of proposed bills under consideration.  So let’s face it: it is great to read about all those proposed bills but what US privacy professionals really want to know is which bills will pass and which bills will

The Lavarious Gardiner v. Walmart Inc. et al. case is anything but typical.

As a re-cap, back in July 2020, plaintiff filed a class action complaint against Walmart alleging that Walmart suffered a data breach which they never disclosed. As evidence of the breach, plaintiff presented claims that the personal information associated with his

CPW readers are already familiar with the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) which took effect this year.  Well, buckle your seatbelts and . . . . bolster your internal security practices as the first settlement under the CCPA has been announced and the area in which it has the greatest impact has nothing to do

For those of you who happened to somehow miss CPW’s prior coverage of the impact of the November election on data privacy litigation, not to worry.  CPW’s Lydia de la Torre, Glenn Brown, Kristin Bryan and Aaron Garavaglia have an article in Law360 expanding upon their prior analysis.  As they explain:

The U.S. is in

The United States is in the process of completing its 59th presidential election and electing its 46th president.  A change in administrations is inevitably accompanied by a change in executive priorities.  Assuming that Vice President Biden is sworn in as President on January 20, 2021, the area of data privacy will likely be of particular