Margaret Booz

CPW’s Kristin Bryan, a 2022 Law360 Privacy & Cybersecurity MVP as well as a featured subject matter expert for LexisNexisChristina Lamoureux, and Margaret Booz have co-authored a new chapter of Lexis Practical Guidance titled “Biometric Privacy and Artificial Intelligence Legal Developments.” In this practice note, they explore emerging legal issues concerning the collection, use, and disclosure of biometric data and artificial intelligence (AI). This includes a discussion of the legal regimes often implicated in lawsuit trends that are likely a harbinger of future litigation, recent developments concerning Article III standing, damages, and class certification and settlement, among other considerations.

Continue Reading Available Now: CPW’s Kristin Bryan, Christina Lamoureux, and Margaret Booz Co-Author Lexis Practice Note on Biometric Privacy and Artificial Intelligence Legal Developments

Last year, CPW covered a litigation win by Clarifai, Inc., a technology company specializing in artificial intelligence, when a federal court granted its motion to dismiss claims brought under Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”) in Stein v. Clarifai, Inc., No. 20 C 1937, 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 49516 (N.D. Ill. Mar. 16, 2021).

As CPW previously reported, President Biden nominated D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court to fill a vacancy opened when Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement. Judge Jackson graduated with honors from Harvard University and Harvard Law School, where she served as editor of the Harvard Law Review. Following her graduation,

In late December, the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida indicated that Article III standing for members of a class action should not be determined at the pleadings stage. In Sharfman v. Premier Medical, Inc., 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 247447 (M.D. Fla. Dec. 29, 2021), the magistrate judge issued a

2021 has been a monumental year in many ways, and consumer financial privacy litigation and enforcement was no exception.  In the executive branch, the Biden Administration focused on strengthening individual privacy protections and limiting the disclosure of sensitive data.  Meanwhile, the Supreme Court’s decision in TransUnion LLC v. Ramirez continues to have a long-lasting impact