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Meghan Quinn

Meghan Quinn is an experienced, results-oriented litigator in the firm’s Washington, DC office. She represents clients in a variety of complex commercial and civil litigations, including consumer finance matters, Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) lawsuits, class actions and MDL proceedings, bankruptcy-related litigations, product liability and mass tort cases, construction claims, and commercial contract disputes. She defends clients in state and federal proceedings throughout the country, and has been an integral part of federal trial teams. Meghan is a skilled advocate in every stage of litigation, from pre-filing investigations, discovery, and motions practice, through trial, post-trial practice, and appeals. She has achieved case dismissals, compelled arbitrations, facilitated early settlements, and obtained other significant victories for clients through her motions practice. Her success derives from her ability to refine complex legal issues and fact patterns and turn them into persuasive arguments that are tailored to align with the client’s distinct needs and business objectives.

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Just a couple weeks ago, we reported on another case from the Eastern District that dismissed a FDCPA case for lack of standing post-TransUnion LLC v. Ramirez, 141 S. Ct. 2190 (2021). Another recent decision from the same court (different judge) shows, yet again, that Ramirez has teeth.  In Grauman, No.

CPW has previously covered how companies can proactively use binding arbitration agreements to manage litigation risk-including in the context of data privacy litigation.  But as a biometric software developer just learned, if you’re not a signatory to the agreement, you better make sure the arbitration clause is drafted broadly enough to cover you to

‘Tis the season.

Cybercrimes always increase during the holidays, but this year could reach new threat levels. With COVID-19 (and as confirmed by the decreased Black Friday foot traffic versus the increased Cyber Monday sales), Americans are expected to do most of their holiday shopping online this year.  In response to this development, the Cybersecurity

As CPW has covered, healthcare data breaches are on the rise (and are likely to continue to do so in light of the rise in telehealth in 2020).  Despite the recent proliferation of data breach litigation, case law hasn’t caught up—you can count on your hands the number of times any court, state or

The Eleventh Circuit recently took a huge bite out of consumers’ ability to bring class actions. In Muransky v. Godiva Chocolatier, Inc., 2020 U.S. App. LEXIS 33995 (11th Cir. Oct. 28, 2020) (en banc), the court uprooted the circuit’s plaintiff-friendly view of standing and forcefully held that consumers can’t sue for technical statutory violations.

The Eleventh Circuit vacated a $490,000 punitive damages award last Friday for a single FCRA violation, finding that there wasn’t enough proof of a willful violation. Considering that the jury had initially awarded $3 million in punitives (which the trial court cut to $490,000 on due process grounds), this is a big win for Experian.

There hasn’t been much litigation in recent years over what constitutes a “firm offer.” And that’s probably, at least in part, because federal courts have allowed lenders to defeat consumer lawsuits by pointing to terms within the offers indicating that they intend to honor the offered credit. But that didn’t stop a California appellate court