California Privacy Protection Agency

The California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) will host its next public meeting on Thursday, May 26, 2022 at 11AM PT. Members of the public may attend in person or virtually by following these instructions. CPPA Director Ashkan Soltani will provide an update on the CPPA’s hiring, budget, and rulemaking activities.  Importantly, subcommittees will provide

The California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) places significant power in the hands of the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA” or “Agency”) to influence the future of privacy regulation in the United States, including—perhaps most importantly—the authority to issue regulations in twenty-two specific, enumerated areas to achieve the broad objective of “further[ing] the purposes of” the

As part of its continued preliminary rulemaking activities, the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) will be holding stakeholder sessions Wednesday, May 4 through Friday, May 6 to provide an opportunity for stakeholders to weigh in on topics relevant to upcoming rulemaking. The Agenda for each of the sessions, which are slated to last an entire day, is available here.
Continue Reading California Privacy Regulator to Hold Stakeholder Sessions First Week of May

On Tuesday, April 5, CPW’s Alan Friel joined forces with Rebecca Perry, Director of Strategic Partnerships at Exterro, to share their expertise during the “Preparing for 2023 – Tools and Tips to Be Ready for New US Privacy Laws” webinar hosted by Global Data Review.

During this one-hour long virtual session, the duo discussed

In case you missed it, below are recent posts from Consumer Privacy World covering the latest developments on data privacy, security and innovation.  Please reach out to the authors if you are interested in additional information.

Federal Court Reaffirms State Privacy Law Not a Shield From Discovery In Federal Litigation Concerning Theft of Client Database

As readers of CPW know, although the California Consumer Protection Act (“CCPA”) and other state statutes provides California residents additional privacy protections there are limits on the laws’ scope.  This includes as was the case here and, consistent with prior rulings, that a defendant may not rely on the CCPA and other state privacy laws

Privacy regulators in California and Colorado recently made announcements regarding rulemaking for their respective state privacy laws. Last week, the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) announced that it will hold its next public meeting this Thursday, February 17, during which it will discuss updates on the rulemaking process, including a timeline. On January 28, Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser publicly announced the intent of the Colorado Office of the Attorney General (“COAG”) to carry out rulemaking activities to implement the Colorado Privacy Act (“CPA”), providing an indication of focus areas and a rough timeline. We discuss each of these developments in further detail below.
Continue Reading California and Colorado Privacy Regulators Provide Updates on Rulemaking

The California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) Board, created by the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), has been busy of late. As we recently reported, the CCPA has hired renowned privacy technologist Ashkan Soltani as its new Executive Director to lead the agency. Meanwhile, the agency’s committees have been hard at work. The Regulations Subcommittee has 

On Friday, October 15 readers of CPW are invited to join CPW’s Alan Friel from Squire Patton Boggs and Ankura experts David Manek and Colleen Yushchak as they discuss key themes from California attorney general’s examples of CCPA non-compliance.  Please join for their insights, which will include essential CCPA compliance tools at TrustWeek OneTrust User

In a significant ruling, the Northern District of California recently denied in part a defendant’s motion to dismiss a complaint alleging violations of various consumer privacy statutes. It found that an affirmative defense of compliance with one privacy statute, the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), did not shield defendant from liability for alleged violations of