Readers of CPW know that our very own Lydia de la Torre has been selected to be an inaugural board member of the new California Privacy Protection Agency.   Listen to what Lydia and Alan Friel, Deputy Chair of SPB’s Data Privacy group have to say in a must-listen to podcast.  They discuss the history

A recent decision from the Supreme Court of New York confirms that to survive dismissal, plaintiffs in data breach actions must establish injury-in-fact through a showing of actual or imminent harm.  In evaluating whether an alleged harm arising from a data breach is actual or imminent, New York courts apply a five-factor balancing test.  Under

Today the CPW team expanded with a three-lawyer, bi-coastal team from BakerHostetler, based in the firm’s Los Angeles, New York and Miami offices.  Their arrival comes on the heel of the firm welcoming Alan L. Friel as Deputy Chair of the Data Practice from BakerHostetler.

The new team comprises: counsel Kyle R. Fath (New York);

Privacy at the state level can get messy and confusing—particularly in the current moment with the record number of proposed bills under consideration.  So let’s face it: it is great to read about all those proposed bills but what US privacy professionals really want to know is which bills will pass and which bills will

On March 4, the Oklahoma Computer Data Privacy Act (HB 1602) passed the state House of Representatives by a vote of 85-11.  If enacted in its current form, the bill would take effect on January 1, 2023, at the same as the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) and the Virginia Consumer Data Protection

In case you missed it, below is a summary of recent posts from CPW.  Please feel free to reach out if you are interested in additional information on any of the developments covered.

What Businesses Need to Know About Virginia’s Consumer Data Protection Act | Consumer Privacy World

Data Litigation Is Growing Fast, And So

Readers of CPW are already familiar with the New York Biometric Bill, which resembles the Illinois Biometric Privacy Act (“BIPA”) and contains a private right of action.  If enacted, it would be a sea change for data privacy litigation in New York.  However, the New York Biometric Bill is not the only privacy legislation

In case you missed it, below is a summary of recent posts from CPW.  Please feel free to reach out if you are interested in additional information on any of the developments covered.

Court Rejects CCPA As Basis for Limiting Scope of Discovery in Litigation | Consumer Privacy World

Court Holds Data Breach Notice Disclosing

On January 6, 2021, a group of seventeen democrats and seven republicans introduced in the New York assembly a new bill, A.B. 27, the “Biometric Privacy Act.” The bill (available for download here) is very similar to the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”) which has spawned much litigation, including many class actions lawsuits.